Business Lessons from Getting My Hair Highlighted

Flying hair
© Cherrymerry | Dreamstime Stock Photos

This is not meant to be one of those “oh look, I have something to say and I’m going to cleverly tie it to getting my hair done”  This is an actual concrete real-world example when I learned the basics of business out of a life experience.

Let me start off by saying that for quite some time I have not loved my hair.  Up in a clip it has gone on all days.  I tried to get it highlighted before the wedding in July but the stylist told me afterwards “I didn’t give you the blond highlights you asked for because I didn’t think you would like them. ” Guess what…I didn’t like my non-highlighted blond hair or the $200 I spent to not get what I asked for.  In fact I sort of have issue when I don’t get what I want especially when I ask and pay for it.

My husband is convinced I was scared to get my hair highlighted and he is in large part 100% correct.  I would love it if we could all just age gracefully allowing our hair color to change over the years.  While I am a non-conformist in many ways I am also a realist and know that if everyone else is going to try to look younger I am not going to sit in a self-righteous slump and go grey.

So back to the same salon I trekked before Christmas.  Why?  Because it is the only organic shop in town and the thought of all those chemicals on my hair makes me a bit crazy.  When I called to make the appointment I did speak to the manager.  I explained that I was not really happy last time I visited and asked for the best colorist she had.  Oh my gosh, I walked out with the perfect result.  I mean, I love my hair.  So let me explain a few things I learned.

  1. You need a support team – this cut and color was in the works for months and required tremendous support from my bff Dannielle as well as the suburb hair coloring ability of Erin.  Without them this might not have happened.
  2. When you are not happy with a service you need to speak up – look, I wasn’t happy the first time around and the manager needed to know.  I didn’t scream, rant, rave or even ask for my money back.  I wanted her to understand that I was coming back for specific reasons and really was committed to finding a better person there to cut my hair.
  3. You need to be clear – I showed up with pictures and wording from Dannielle.  Basically I could have prepared a power point presentation on what was wrong with my hair and what I really wanted.
  4. You need to show grace – I am the first to admit that I had no idea what I was talking about when it comes to cut, color, decorating, styling, trends, (or cooking for that matter).  Yet, I am the client and should walk out happy.  This means I may have to go above and beyond and do my research to properly communicate what I want, and I need to do that in a non-superior tone that conveys I need the stylist’s help…no matter how much I hate spending (wasting) time being with her.

In building my business I have learned that grace, clarity, preparation and tact can go a long way when coupled with your expertise.  After all, I am the first person you should call if you have a social media or blogging question…no doubt about it.  But, I am the last person you should call to cook you dinner (unless you REALLY like pizza).